Art at BRIT

The Madeline R. Samples Exhibit Hall & Upper Atrium Collections Gallery

Art at BRIT offers two distinctive art viewing spaces: the elegant Madeline R. Samples Exhibit Hall and the smaller, more intimate Upper Atrium Collections Gallery. The Samples Exhibit Hall showcases botanical art and artwork dealing with topics such as ecology, plants, sustainability, conservation, and the natural world – we highlight work by local and national artists, both well-known and emerging. The Upper Atrium Collections Gallery features a rotation of botanical and nature-based prints from our Library collection, including The Arader Natural History Collection of Art. We honor and celebrate the traditional roots of botanical art, while also expanding and redefining the field for the 21st century.

Program Information

Free to the public.

Point of Contact

Erin Starr White

Community Education Manager

Art at BRIT offers two distinctive art viewing spaces: the elegant Madeline R. Samples Exhibit Hall and the smaller, more intimate Upper Atrium Collections Gallery. The Samples Exhibit Hall showcases botanical art and artwork dealing with topics such as ecology, plants, sustainability, conservation, and the natural world – we highlight work by local and national artists, both well-known and emerging. The Upper Atrium Collections Gallery features a rotation of botanical and nature-based prints from our Library collection, including The Arader Natural History Collection of Art. We honor and celebrate the traditional roots of botanical art, while also expanding and redefining the field for the 21st century.

Current Events

Emerging Artists: Herbarium on Canvas

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This fall, the BRIT herbarium hosted Texas Christian University painting professor Adam Fung's Beginning Painting class. Students toured the herbarium and spent time sketching examples from our extensive collection of approximately 1,445,000 plant specimens from around the world. After creating watercolor sketches, each student translated her work into a small oil painting. It is these paintings that make up Emerging Artists: Herbarium on Canvas, on view in the Welcome Center Gallery this fall. 

Come engage with and enjoy these creative translations of the botanical specimens at the heart of BRIT's mission. We are proud to showcase the artwork of such promising young TCU painters!

Taylor Cuozzo, 8 x 8", oil on canvas over panel, 2019

Young Artists: All Saints' Episcopal School

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All Saints’ Episcopal School of Fort Worth is delighted to showcase the art of its Upper School, Middle School, and Lower School art students, alumni, and art educators at BRIT's Madeline R. Samples Exhibit Hall. The art on view focuses on botanical subjects in a variety of media and styles. 

The All Saints’ Episcopal School of Fort Worth’s Visual Arts Program aims to motivate students to explore essential questions, which results in developing and expanding visual perception, aesthetic awareness, historic perspective, artistic skills, and techniques and critical thinking practices. Through a sequential, developmental curriculum alignment, which emphasizes critical thinking, students have the opportunity to learn and analyze works of art while gaining the skills of fine artisanship. The overall objective is for students to emerge with refined technical skills, a well-informed appreciation of the expression of others, and confidence to cultivate art reflecting their artistic vision.

Isabel Logan, Tree, 2019

Upcoming Events

Subjective Terrain

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The Botanical Research Institute of Texas is proud to host an exhibition of paintings by Fort Worth-based artists, Dennis and Daniel Blagg. Subjective Terrain showcases the grandeur of the Texas landscape through two unique artistic visions. Both contemporary landscape painters, Dennis Blagg paints the Big Bend region of West Texas and Daniel Blagg captures predominantly urban landscapes. Both painters look to the rich tradition of landscape painting for inspiration, while adding their concern for the safeguarding of the land that inspires them. 

Dennis Blagg’s painted vistas of the remote mountain desert of Big Bend, void of human presence, pulse with the vibrancy of mountains, flora, clouds, and sunlight. Due to the harsh climate of his chosen muse, he paints from photographs; an undeniable sense of place emerges from his canvases, at once subjective and universal. Daniel Blagg’s compositions of large-scale, old-fashioned neon signs set against sweeping views of open land and sky elicit curiosity – what is this place and what happened here? These vast, and by turns foreboding and sublime, views of the Texas landscape call to mind the relationship between humans and their environment. The viewer is left to make sense of just what that relationship might be. What has humankind subjected its environment to, and what stories do we tell ourselves about it?

Daniel Blagg, Fatherland, 2017, oil on panel, 24" x 48"

Past Events